Off Grid Mom LIfe

The Way it is for Now, But Not Forever

Well here goes nothing…

First, I want to say I am a very private person. If I’m having a bad day you wouldn’t guess it. I really don’t like talking about myself and don’t as much as possible. So this is a huge stretch for me…and important. After living in this area for 6 years I have had a professional relationship with the community as the local school’s music teacher…and lets face it, when was the last time you invited your child’s teacher to a friendly gathering. I can count 1 in 6 years. We of course are getting our homestead put together so inviting anyone over is restricted to a very select few. Mostly, “No, you can’t come over,” which I hate. But that’s just the way it is for now, not forever. I have to tell myself this constantly. 
That being said, there are fewer people I call friends here then I have fingers on one hand. We don’t have any family within 800 miles to boot either. So we are very much on our own.  
So if I’m being honest I want to share my off grid mom life partially for selfish reasons; having “someone to talk to” and hopefully to shed some light on the realities of both motherhood and off grid living as it relates to motherhood…or at least as I have experienced it. You are invited to partake as I document my growth, off grid mom life and and our progress on along the way. 
I imagine weather you live off grid, aspire to someday, or have a wonderful well established life in some city, you will be able to relate on some level…or at least enjoy following a life that is far from normal in every sense of the word. If you have ever felt so far removed from those around you that you can hardly have a conversation, or are in a state of change, a mom, a grandmother or just looking for something new to read, I hope you enjoy and can connect with me on some level and I with you.
So who am I? In short, I am a wife of 10 years, mother of three daughters ages 7, 5 and 3 and if that wasn’t enough, we are expecting identical twin boys in October! I am currently about 6 months along. I have been living off gird with my daughters and husband for 6 years now.  We started homeschooling this past March and will do so this up coming school year unless I lose my mind after having these boys. 
What’s my off grid mom life like? I’d love to say it’s the most blissful thing ever; gardens gushing with fruit and vegetables, chickens for eggs and meat, horses to ride, perfect landscape that I stare at while sitting on the front porch, while my picture perfect children play happily, husband at my beck and call, ending each day with a warm bath in a beautiful log cabin or something. …Well let me just say, if this is your life then you need not hear mine…that is a wonderful dream and the farthest thing from my life possible. 
What is my life really like? Hard. Tiring. Currently very hot. Often lacking adventure. You know typical mom life at times…but without A/C.  “I hate it,” I think more often then I care to admit. I’m often lonely, and sick of waiting for life’s comforts. That being said I do really like my very spacious, quite homestead even with my loud, rambunctious children. The beautiful mountain views and rolling hills in the distance are just perfect. While I don’t have any of the above mentioned luxuries, it’s just the way it is for now, not forever. That is the hardest part of this living. Having patience. LOTS and LOTS of patience. Especially when there is only one person for the most part doing the homesteading work while the other (me) is doing the kid stuff. 

So why am I doing this? Well, this life style is unknown and inconceivable by many and could not be more underestimated. We moved from Los Angeles and Las Vegas to rural Northern California because we were sick of the hum drum life of work, make money, pay bills, be broke, repeat and still have nothing to show for it. Every time I have a rough day, or I’m sick of seeing dirt all over the floor 5 minutes after I swept, or looking at the project that was started 6 months ago that is still on hold because of “more important things,” or the unfinished kitchen without water running through the faucet, I think of having a nice normal house. But immediately following are thoughts like, “the neighbors would be way too close,” (we can’t see a neighbor from our house), “we wouldn’t have any space for the kids to play” (we have 3 acres), my husband and I wouldn’t see our kids enough since we would both need to have 9 to 5s for the bills.  ….I am quickly reminded that we are very lucky and maybe too smug when it comes to the “normal” way of life. But I am a firm believer in doing what makes you happy. I mean if you’re happy then you’ll do everything better then if you’re hating life?  This feels more like a theory since I’m not always very happy to live this way, but I do look forward to one day building our forever home with the kids. I love the idea that we need to be on the same team. When my girls play outside they know they need to watch out for each other. Not from strangers, but from falling out of a tree. While Seattle was getting the hang of climbing trees (haha) Brooklynn would help her by telling her where to get her footing or where to grab. They have to stick together incase there is a rattlesnake. They know what they look like and sound like and the dangers they bring. It is unreal for many, but I think it’s a great way to understand life and be a contributor to family early on. 
It is a hard life that requires a lot of patience, and certainty one that is the way it is for now, but not forever. Over all having space to see my girls run top speed for minutes, and climb ropes and trees and hear the birds without traffic noises makes it worth the hard. 
All these things just barely scratch the surface but it is a start. 
I am a realistic optimist. I hope for the best but certainly don’t count on it. I’ll be talking more about our daily life and my thoughts on having twins and how I’m doing and all that in my up coming posts. Hope you liked getting to know me a little better. I can use all the support I can get. 
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18 thoughts on “The Way it is for Now, But Not Forever

  1. I'm so happy you started doing this! I hope that it helps you. I can understand the loneliness, except my family lives here & I rarely – if ever – talk to them, let alone see them. I moved away twice because I hated being so close to the people who were supposed to care but don't. I've lived here almost my whole life & close friends seem to have eluded me. I love reading about your adventures, no matter whether you are always happy with your situation or not. You're doing things your way, which is often the hard way, but there's something to say for that. "Realistic optimist" is something I can understand; I've always labeled myself a cynical optimist. Keep all this up. Some of us are enjoying the peeks into your life! ��

  2. I can't tell you how much everything you said means to me. I am in disbelief that more then 2 people know what I have said and feel. Thank you for your interest and shareing apart of your life with me. 💗😂

  3. Wow Cari, what a great start to your blog. I communicate with you both quite often from my spot here in Muskoka Canada. I have been used to the general amenities of a professional life here but more so in southern Ontario. I would not go back south.
    I grew up with my grandparents living about 4 hours north of where we had grown up. When we went there to visit food and heat all centered on the woodstove & water came from a pump at the side of the kitchen. It was the same at our cottage.
    That said I DO have some understanding but it's history now.
    Your blog brings me back to that and plants a grin on my face & a very warm spot in my heart!
    I am so excited about the twins! I must say though that I marvel at your endurance!
    Please keep the blog alive. I really enjoyed your first outing!
    Stay Well! Kent.

  4. Wow Cari, what a great start to your blog. I communicate with you both quite often from my spot here in Muskoka Canada. I have been used to the general amenities of a professional life here but more so in southern Ontario. I would not go back south.
    I grew up with my grandparents living about 4 hours north of where we had grown up. When we went there to visit food and heat all centered on the woodstove & water came from a pump at the side of the kitchen. It was the same at our cottage.
    That said I DO have some understanding but it's history now.
    Your blog brings me back to that and plants a grin on my face & a very warm spot in my heart!
    I am so excited about the twins! I must say though that I marvel at your endurance!
    Please keep the blog alive. I really enjoyed your first outing!
    Stay Well! Kent.

  5. Cari, I really enjoyed your post , the extreme honesty was beautiful! If you don't tell people, who will? A lot of people, including me, are living their dreams through you and your family! I love all of you and this is a grand idea for you! Stay blessed! Sharon Lozano

  6. I typed several paragraphs on my phone, then asked to preview the post and it vanished! This is take two.

    I'm glad you're posting your thoughts and feelings. Although you never knew Edna Schotte, my mother's mother, she shared the same pioneering spirit with you.

    I remember visiting her log cabin that my grandfather built. It had a water pump outside, a coal furnace in the basement and a fireplace large enough for me to walk into. OK, I was only five, but still.

    Then there was the wash machine. It was a big tub that had an agitator in it (no lid) and two rollers that swung out of the way. After it agitated for a while (no timer) we would grab the clothes basket then swing the roller over and turn it on. As we fed the clothes into it, it would squeeze out the soapy water. We'd put those clothes in the basket. Then we'd drain the tub, fill it with fresh water and put the clothes back. We'd start the process again to rinse out the soap. Rinse, repeat. Then, after the last squeezing, we'd fill the basket and take the clothes to the clothesline and hang them up with clothespins. After they dried, we'd fold the clothes and bring them in. Looking back, it was really a lot of fun. I'm sure the kids will look back with fondness at these times.

    Looking forward to seeing you next week.

    Love you!

  7. Thank you Sharon! You are so sweet and I love you are coming on this adventure with us. It may have been to real…I didn't think it would get more then 10 or so reads. I haven't put myself out there quite like this before. Thank you for your support 🙂

  8. Hey Kent,your story sounds a little like my past also. Your story made me grin,especially the wood stove and the pump! lol. I grew up part of my young life in Callander. Was the happiest time in my life,nothing was easy but you never knew anything else! We didn't have indoor plumbing and I'm only 57 years old,lol. I know the attraction of Muskoka and the area. Our plan is similar to go just east of you. Our biggest hurtle is the leap,lol. We'll get there.

  9. Hey Cari. Glad you are sharing! thanks Like I told Jason I'm Glad you are doing this,I was tired of listening to him!! lol not really! I have to tell you i'm envious of you two. We are planning the off grid life. Your comment on Working to pay bills and not having nothing really hits home. I never remembered signing a contract to be enslaved to corporations and governments!! I know,a little dramatic but truly the way I feel. When I read your post I knew you got that!! Anyway Cari I look forward to reading more from you and less from Jason!! Of course I'm kidding Cheers Shawn

  10. That's too funny Shawn! I'm glad you can relate. I'm excited for your adventure going off grid. It may be hard…but it couldn't possibly be harder then giving your life away to pay for things that don't mean much in the end…or even today. I look forward to following your impending adventure!

  11. I think you and your family are amazing. ..and I can relate to being far away from family it sucks sometimes especially around holidays…I am not a homesteaders as of now but one day I hope to be… I follow your family on Facebook and you guys all bring a smile to my face so thank you for that…I look forward to reading your blog ! I wish you the best!

  12. I think you and your family are amazing. ..and I can relate to being far away from family it sucks sometimes especially around holidays…I am not a homesteaders as of now but one day I hope to be… I follow your family on Facebook and you guys all bring a smile to my face so thank you for that…I look forward to reading your blog ! I wish you the best!

  13. Thank you! I totally know what you mean. I am hopeful to have family out here some day before our kids move out. But in the mean time thank you for your kind words. It means a lot. ❤ I wish you the best on getting to your homestead some day.

  14. Wow Cari, I loved hearing your story! I truly am envious! I live alone, with my husband- he is a work-aholic but still finds time for activities outside the home! And our daughter, only child, has grown up and moved on! Although we do talk several times a week, the distance between us is vast & deafening! I'm a semi-disabled middle aged woman, that has always dreamed of living a life such as yours! Now I'm afraid it is too late, as I have many health issues that would prevent me from being as independent as yourselves! So I will enjoy living my dreams threw you and Jason! I just friend requested him on FB, and to my surprise he excepted!
    I love how much in love you two are, are how honest and open you are about life, it isn't always perfect but it is as happy as you make it with what you have!
    Congrats on the twins, you must be so over joyed and excited to be having such a wonderful blessing & addition to your lovely family! I wish you the best in all you and Jason do! And I'm looking forward to reading every single one of your blogs! I love listening to Jason's videos! I sit and crochet, listening and watching one after another, sometimes watching the same one more than once! You two are such amazing people, thanks for allowing me into your lives! Bless you always! Melinda ��

  15. Melinda, thank you so much for your kind words and encouragement. I am so happy that we get to be apart of your life and you apart of ours. It is a challengimg life but worth the hard. I often hope that I'll look back on our choices fondly and be glad we have lived like we are. But when I see my kids playing outside climbing ropes and trees while laughing and feeling proud they did it it makes me feel so good. I hope you enjoy taking this journey with us. ❤

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